Review | The Birth of a Nation
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The Birth of a Nation
Movie Critic Dave's Ratings
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2.0
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Movie Critic Dave's Ratings
Stars
2.0
Grade
User Stars
Total Votes: 2
Average Rating: 2.25
2.25
Rate!
0.0
Only members can vote
Member Login
Release:
November 10, 2016
Rated:
R
Run Time:
120 min
Homepage:
Budget:
$8,500,000
Revenue:
$15,861,566
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Review
By Movie Critic Dave

The Sundance Film Festival has become a gold mine for major studios looking to profit off of reasonably budgeted works. And when one movie hits the trifecta of earning the Audience Award, the Grand Jury Prize and a record-setting $17.5 million deal with Fox Searchlight Pictures, in the famous words of Ron Burgundy, it's "kind of a big deal". Writer, director and star Nate Parker's debut feature, The Birth of a Nation, accomplished the difficult feat and leaves us all wondering, what exactly are the film's Oscar chances?


Prior to the Civil War, Nat Turner (Parker) is a literate slave and preacher who's spent his entire life on the plantation of inherited owner, Samuel Turner (Armie Hammer). Considering the times, Samuel provides his workers with a more desirable lifestyle as he entrusts Nat to keep morale high. But as a drought strikes the area and finances grow tight, Samuel sells Nat's preaching services to nearby slave owners where Nat discovers terrible atrocities that ultimately push him into leading a violent uprising in Virginia.

 


Much has been written and discussed regarding director Nate Parker's 1999 rape case, but I'll choose to redirect my focus to his artistic expression in question. The Birth of a Nation is a mightily flawed film that struggles to tell a nuanced story or address any form of character development other than the movie's main protagonist. Parker's effort falls flat by failing to shed any new light on the slave-era genre. Instead, it relies on stereotypical white southern villains and abrasive imagery as an exploitative device to capture the audience's attention. This is neither constructive nor beneficial to the grand scope of storytelling. Yet, I imagine the tactics will end up successful in some instances among a general audience. On the flip side, Nate Parker does prove to be a strong actor who's capable of carrying a film. His passion for the subject matter pours through his veins in countless onscreen moments. However, a prolonged cookie-cutter introduction to the main character dilutes the emotional finale of a violent slave uprising. The Birth of a Nation was able to keep me engaged in the film all while unveiling its many faults. The blood-soaked closing sequence didn't disappoint, but the hour and 45 minute build-up certainly did.


 

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